Saturday, October 20, 2018

The Final Chapter - Showing off a 'small island' - Part 11

I am misty-eyed at the moment.  It's those darn posts of mine that I just re-read.  It seemed like a good idea.  After all, I am about to wrap up the epic saga of the UK tour we enjoyed giving to my sister and her husband during the summer of 2017.  Surely, a look in the rearview mirror would get me in the right frame of mind for this final chapter?  What it got me was deep into the Kleenex box.  
Derwent Water viewed from Cat Bells trail

My adoration for northeast England is acute, and spending an hour gazing at sublime photos and reviewing narrative was a tad emotional.
Newlands Valley from Cat Bells

What did I see?  Countryside patched with ancient drystone walls.  Ruined abbeys slumbering peacefully in lush valleys.  Rivers and waterfalls that pursue their courses as they have through the millennia.  The glory of formal gardens, that existed only in the imagination of the designer hundreds of years of ago.  Historic churches, silent witnesses to the faithful housed in their floors and cemeteries.  Pubs that could tell many a tale.

And I realized that capturing the beauty of my adopted country has given me great joy, a joy I will grieve now that I write the final chapter of the travelogue.  (see previous posts about this trip to the UK - Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5, Part 6, Part 7, Part 8, Part 9, Part 10) .
Sheep under a massive oak tree

But I will postpone my moisture for a minute or two, so I can share our last adventure from that trip - a hike to Cat Bells Summit.








Any walker/hiker needs fuel for the journey, and it is wise to start the day with a full English at the bed and breakfast.
A traditional Full English breakfast includes back bacon, fried, poached or 
scrambled eggs, fried or grilled tomatoes, fried mushrooms, fried bread or 
toast with butter, sausages, baked beans and black pudding.  (I did
without the black pudding!)

Fortified, our good fortune continued when we located a parking spot right at the trailhead, which is most unusual, given the popularity of this walk.

The "steep" bit
Renowned Lake District writer and walker Alfred Wainwright acknowledges the reputation of Cat Bells among fellwalkers of all abilities:  "It is one of the great favorites, a family fell where grandmothers and infants can climb the heights together, a place beloved.  Its popularity is well-deserved, its shapely topknot attracts the eye, offering a steep but obviously simple scramble."
Yes, we saw a mole along the way ...
High Seat as seen from Cat Bells
Newlands Valley from Cat Bells

I must say that I was very proud of my sister and brother in law when they conquered this fell.  Their fitness level had improved dramatically in the time leading up to their visit, owing to frequent walks around their neighborhood.  Cat Bells 'topped off' the UK hikes we completed during their stay.

Panorama shot from Cat Bells

Cat Bells Summit

And in more way than one - when we returned to our car, we discovered a special gift - a ticket!  Turns out that parking spot was actually on a double-yellow line.  Oops!


Linking to:

All Seasons

Mosaic Monday

Nature Notes

Our World Tuesday
Our World Tuesday Graphic
Sharon's Photo Souvenirs
Skywatch Friday
Wednesday Around the World

41 comments:

  1. ...it's easy to see your love affair. Beautiful countryside.

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  2. Well written and great photos!

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  3. That is such beautiful place and that breakfast looks terrific!

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  4. Glorious views from Cat Bells! Good thing you fueled up on that breakfast. Sorry about that ticket! I really hope we can return to Bonnie England before we get too much older! Hope you are having a good weekend.

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  5. What a beautiful place, I can understand your love affair with it! I have never seen a vole before! I enjoyed your travelogue.

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  6. What a beautiful walk! sorry about your ticket, I hope it didn't set you back too much. How long did you live in England and do you think you will ever move back there?

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  7. Lovely impressions, a wonderful landscape... Happy MosaicMonday!

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  8. Beautiful! I can see why it would bring one to tears ... including the vole!!! Thank you for letting me be an armchair traveler!

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  9. wonderful valleys and delicious breakfast.
    Have a great day

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  10. Stunning & breathtaking green views of Newlands Valley! Happy MM.

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  11. Hello, gorgeous scenic views from your England trip. The hike does look steep. I like the view of the little island and the beautiful valley. Awesome photos. Enjoy your day, have a great new week!

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  12. Now you know why no one else had parked there! Loved this post as much as all the previous ones as I revisit one of the most beautiful areas that my homeland has to offer. Once upon a time I hankered after a small cottage in the village of Reeth but it wasn't to be, now I've got a tear in my eye too.
    Maybe one day we can meet up in a small cosy pub in the Yorkshire Dales or have tea at Betty's in Harrogate? Now wouldn't that be a treat!
    Happy MM.

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  13. I have visited almost all of Ireland (land of many ancestors)but have yet to set foot in England, Angie, so I enjoyed seeing all your photos and reading your narrative about this beautiful part of the country. I'm sure it was hard to leave your sister and brother-in-law behind, but there is more the reason to make a visit again soon!

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  14. What a lovely place! And hope you are enjoying one of our best Falls ever! :) Kit

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  15. I imagined myself eating breakfast with you, including having a try of the blood pudding. Jury still out on that. I pulled myself up the trail, enjoying the feel the rock under my hands for support and pushing off on my cane as I walked one step to the next. I loved the views, oh my gosh. Thanks for taking me to Cat Bells Summit, Angie. Happy tears for me. :-)

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  16. Beautiful walk, beautiful place ... no wonder you are misty-eyed remembering this amazing trip. I remember the full English breakfast from our London visit (too short and too long ago). Bill actually tried the Black Pudding!

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  17. It really was a trip you will remember forever! And being emotional is to be expected! I've enjoyed looking at your photos and imagining the thrill of walking those trails and seeing this sights. Thanks for sharing! THANKS to for taking MM! You'll do GREAT! Hugs!

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  18. That breakfast would hold me for the entire day, I think! What great memories you've shared with us of your trip to the UK and sharing it with family. I've enjoyed every post. Walking those trails and seeing the views is the best way to see a country, especially one so rich in the tradition of walking as England. Along with the countryside there is history at every turn. Just lovely.

    Thank you for taking on the hosting of Mosaic Monday!

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  19. Shame on you for eschewing the black pudding! That is the very best part of an English breakfast. It is one of the treats I look forward to when I visit the UK. The best I have ever had is at The Grant Arms Hotel at Speyside in Scotland. Every day I would go down to breakfast fully intending to be virtuous and have fruit, cereal and yogurt, or something healthy like that, and the black pudding would draw me in like iron filings to a magnet. On the finally morning I even had black pudding and haggis. Now that’s the breakfast of champions!

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  20. Sorry about the ticket Angie. I hope you kept it as a souvenir? I must say, I agree with David. A tiny bit of Black Pudding should be part of every Full English, Irish or Scottish.

    I get quite emotional when I look back at some of our own times on holiday - Greece, India and Canada spring to mind. It's about time spent with family and friends as well as the place don't you think?

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  21. I noticed your comment in Phil’s blog, Angie, that you do care about The Sixth Extinction and that you should get more involved in trying to influence other people. I can well imagine that will be an uphill battle in a red state like Montana that embraces Trump and his destructive policies, and is capable of filling an auditorium with people who laugh at his support of a yahoo politician who body slams reporters. I am always in awe of the breathtaking scenery you show us, which Republicans would deface in a heartbeat if they could mine it, log it or otherwise exploit and pollute it. Homo sapiens is doomed, plain and simple.

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  22. I agree with David, Trump is a bad one. Anyway, time for photos, they are beautiful, the Lake District is superb, love your photos.

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  23. I sit in awe of the beauty you captured. I've always wanted to go to Brtain, take garden tours, tours of old castles and ruins, and just soak in the natural beauty. Thanks for all the trips you've shared with me.

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  24. Oops! No wonder it seemed like the perfect parking spot. :) Such beautiful countryside and so much history in the UK.

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  25. Looks like a wonderful place for a walk, beautiful views

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  26. Gorgeous place and lovely photographs of its beauty ~ Britain's countryside is memorable ~ especially with family ~

    Happy Day to you,
    A ShutterBug Explores,
    aka (A Creative Harbor)

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  27. This part of the UK is stunning! I can see why you get teary-eyed. Fabulous shots too, by the way!

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  28. Beautiful landscape and stunning photos.

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  29. I understand why you love it there. Such a nice countryside. Definitely worth to visit.

    Anna
    www.glamadventure.com

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  30. What a remarkable post! So glad we've met.

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  31. Gorgeous "fell" and beautiful countryside. I can totally see why you are in love with it. So sorry about the ticket!

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  32. I believe the Lake district is where Beatrix Potter lived. I think that would be a wonderful place to visit.

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  33. I'm sorry you are feeling sad when you reminisce about your visit to this lovely area of England. The scenery is quite spectacular and it's wonderful you were able to enjoy it with your dear sister and BIL.

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  34. Who would've thought there could be double yellow lines near those gorgeous views. Gorgeous scenery. 'Tis not hard to understand how you might miss these wonderful places.

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  35. Oh, no! A ticket.
    I love the mole! What an epic journey.

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  36. It is lovely and peaceful and soothing..I needed that today...Michelle

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  37. I miss English breakfast so much!

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